German Man Ordered To Delete Naked Images Of His Ex Even If…

A German man has been ordered to delete intimate photos of his ex-partner, regardless of whether he had ever planned to share them, after judges said that he no longer had consent.

Germany’s Federal Court ruled that although the woman had agreed to have the photographs taken, her consent ended when the relationship did.

Keeping the nude photos and videos violates her right to privacy, even if the man has no intention for anyone else to see them, the court said.

The Federal Court’s ruling states that ‘everyone had the right to decide whether to grant insight into their sex life – including to whom they grant permission and in what form,’ the BBC said.

The ruling concluded that by keeping the photos and videos, the man had ‘manipulative power’ over his ex, and needs to delete all images, however it is not clear how the court will enforce this.

This follows an introduction of revenge porn as an offence in the UK earlier this year, as part of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act.

Since April, distributing revenge porn – sexually-explicit images shared without consent – is punishable with up to two years in prison

Press delete: Germany's Federal Court ruled that although the man's ex had agreed to have the photographs taken, her consent ended when the relationship did (stock  image)

Press delete: Germany’s Federal Court ruled that although the man’s ex had agreed to have the photographs taken, her consent ended when the relationship did (stock image)

Prosecutors previously had to find evidence of harassment or copyright infringement when seeking to take someone to court. However, the introduction of the revenge porn law has offered greater protection for victims.

The campaign to ban revenge porn gathered pace – and cross-party political support – following high-profile leaks of intimate celebrity images last year, making victims of pop stars Rihanna and Tulisa Contostavlos.

But non-celebrities are also increasingly victims of the crime, often carried out by by ex-partners using intimate photos taken during their relationship using smartphones.

Last year, the EU forced Google into changing its privacy policy in Europe following the ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling, with the internet giant having to create a submissions page for users who wanted to request links to old stories be removed from search results about them.

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